Famous James Cook in search of Templar Treasure

James_cook_FAMOUS JAMES COOK IN SEARCH OF TEMPLAR TREASURE

The navigator James Cook sailed on August 26, 1768 on the ship ‘Endeavor’ from the English port of Plymouth to the island of Tahiti, and on February 14, 1779, he was killed by the Hawaiian natives. It is known. But to this day, his three missions to unknown lands and mysterious overseas countries have been accompanied by a series of secrets. More precisely, with a series of questions to which there are no answers yet.


Several scientists from England, America and Europe, who are considered to be the best experts on Cook’s travels and the circumstances under which he was entrusted with the command of ships and crews three times in a row, claim that he belonged to the so-called neo-Templars. They believe that, therefore, he, initially an unknown and inexperienced sailor of low social status, was entrusted with the task of allegedly observing the passage of Venus over the solar circle from the island of Tahiti on June 3, 1769. In fact, the real, secret task was to try to find an unknown land somewhere in Oceania, and a Templar treasure hidden on it.


It is claimed that the then King of England was aware of that, and that is exactly why he agreed to finance not only Cook’s first expedition with the money of the crown, but also the next two. And it is known that in Cook’s time, as well as in the time of Columbus and a number of other expeditions, the rulers did not give money for scientific research, but only for those that promised to find gold and precious stones, raw materials, new territories that would join the kingdoms.


In Cook’s case, officially, none of this was in the plan, but just an observation of Venus. Of course, that was a story for naive people.
From the time when the Templars were banned in 1300, many of them were executed at the stake and the survivors were ruthlessly persecuted, there is a legend that some of the surviving monks – warriors managed to secretly leave Europe and find salvation partly on the American continent, partly on some , a land known only to them somewhere in Oceania. And that they carried most of the Templar’s movable wealth. Judging by the facts, huge. Legend has it that the survivors hid the treasure on a land in Oceania and that it is still there.


If it is possible that some Templars managed to escape the pogroms, the question arises as to how the monks-warriors survived and knew how to sail towards Oceania. Because, at the time of their exodus, Europe had no idea that that part of the world existed at all. It wasn’t until the time of James Cook that she sensed that ‘there was something there’.


The answer given today by the researchers of Cook’s expeditions is: the Teplars, like later Columbus and Cook, had ‘secret maps’, geographical maps that the monks – warriors, by grace or force, came to when they were in the Holy Land and which they took it when they left it.


Thanks to these maps, the Templars managed to reach Oceania. They were also used by Columbus and Cook. This explains how the two of them managed to reach the destination without major problems, avoiding the traps that the seas set for other sailors. Those maps, or at least their faithful copies, were in the possession of the so-called neo-Templars, who had them at their disposal in both Columbus’s and Cook’s time.


Whether they handed over some of those maps to Columbus, and why, has not been clarified. As for Hook, it is believed that they were available and handed over to him, because he was a neo-Templar himself, so that, using them, he could reach the buried Templar treasure. The fact is that Cook was the first to easily cross the so-called Great Barrier Reef without any problems, which almost completely surrounds both Australia and New Zealand. Exactly those two territories that Cook explored in detail. He, it has been proven, guided the ship perfectly accurately on arrival through several relatively narrow passages through the reef. He repeated that on his return.


One of the big questions is why 40-year-old unknown James Cook, when it came to deciding who would lead the mission of ‘observing Venus over Tahiti’, was proposed to the king by none other than the then Secretary of the Admiralty – now the First Lord of the Admiralty. So, the most responsible man of the then British navy and the head of the royal chancellery, whose task was to determine which expeditions would be financed with the money of the crown.


It seems that the secretary was in close contact with the neo-Templars from Scotland, who stood behind Cook. There is simply no other explanation for such a choice of the leading expedition.


The fact that Cook was associated with the Neo-Templars or that he was also their Grand Master or at least masters, probably explains why Alexander Darlimpli, at that time the most respected English astronomer and geographer, instead of leading an expedition to Tahiti, was forced to Cook , whom he otherwise hated, handed over all his maps and calculations. Darlimpli was not even a member of Cook’s expedition, because the lesser-known astronomer Charles Green from the Royal Astronomical Society was boarded by someone’s decision.

It is also a surprise that the then rich banker Joseph Banks (surely he also liked to see Venus), who will become the president of the Royal Society a few years later, partly because he traveled with Cook.
According to the findings of several contemporary English historians, there are indications that both Green and Banks were related to the Neo-Templars and that is why they were added to Cook. Historians believe that the old legend about the mythical Eldorado, which was sought by the Spanish conquistadors in the areas of the Maya and Incas, originated from the legend of the secret Templar treasure.


There is another unusual piece of information related to Cook’s search. It is a letter written on March 10, 1779 – written support to him and his crew sent from America by the famous Benjamin Franklin, the inventor of the lightning rod. Franklin did not do it by accident, nor with the intention of encouraging another scientific discovery. On the contrary, he did so because he himself was in a relationship with the Neotemplars. So Franklin also knew about the Templar treasure and encouraged Cook to find it. There are indications that he hoped that Cook, when he found the treasure, would come to America instead of England, and that in that way he would finance the American anti-colonial struggle.


But none of this happened. Cook found neither a new continent nor any treasure in New Zealand. But the legend of the Templar’s hidden treasure somewhere outside Europe still survives and excites the imagination. It is also a surprise that the then rich banker Joseph Banks (surely he also liked to see Venus), who will become the president of the Royal Society a few years later, partly because he traveled with Cook.


According to the findings of several contemporary English historians, there are indications that both Green and Banks were related to the Neo-Templars and that is why they were added to Cook. Historians believe that the old legend about the mythical Eldorado, which was sought by the Spanish conquistadors in the areas of the Maya and Incas, originated from the legend of the secret Templar treasure.


There is another unusual piece of information related to Cook’s search. It is a letter written on March 10, 1779 – written support to him and his crew sent from America by the famous Benjamin Franklin, the inventor of the lightning rod. Franklin did not do it by accident, nor with the intention of encouraging another scientific discovery. On the contrary, he did so because he himself was in a relationship with the Neotemplars. So Franklin also knew about the Templar treasure and encouraged Cook to find it. There are indications that he hoped that Cook, when he found the treasure, would come to America instead of England, and that in that way he would finance the American anti-colonial struggle.


But none of this happened. Cook found neither a new continent nor any treasure in New Zealand. But the legend of the Templar’s hidden treasure somewhere outside Europe still survives and excites the imagination.

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